Sunday, September 19, 2021

#OnThisDay: William Dyer's baptism


I want to know who allowed the werewolves on the left side of the image.
The woodcut is of an English christening in 1581.
 


© 2021 Christy K Robinson

William Dyer was born, say many genealogical sites, on Sept. 19, 1609. Well, maybe not "on this day" precisely, as he was baptized (christened) on Tuesday, Sept. 19. He might have been born up to a week earlier.

The church where William Dyer was baptized still stands in Kirkby LaThorpe, Lincolnshire. For a description of the interior, and photos, please read my article at
https://marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com/2018/05/kirkby-la-thorpes-church-of-st-denys.html

To read some of the many articles on this site that describe William Dyer's remarkable life and accomplishments, read this selection, and then hit "Next Posts" at the bottom of that page.



Sunday, June 13, 2021

Lincolnshire magazine posts Dyer hometown connection

Copyright 2021 by Christy K Robinson 

In the spring of 2021, I was asked to write a 600-word magazine article on William Dyer and Kirkby LaThorpe, the village where he was born in 1609. The article was published in "Heckington Living," a 40-page lifestyle magazine for Lincolnshire. The magazine editor had discovered my article and photos about the Kirkby LaThorpe church, from this website.

The editor, Amy Lennox, wrote: "Thank you again for your article - the locals were very complimentary about this issue!" I took screenshots, so here you go:



See:

* William Dyer's boyhood and education in KLT and Sleaford, Carre Grammar School <William & Mary Dyer: William Dyer’s boyhood (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>

** Church of St Denys in Kirkby La Thorpe <William & Mary Dyer: Kirkby La Thorpe’s Church of St. Denys (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>

The bubonic and typhoid plagues of 1625, including in Lincolnshire: <William & Mary Dyer: William Dyer’s annus horribilis -- Plagues of 1625 (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>

The Great Frost of 1608: <William & Mary Dyer: The Great Frost of 1608 (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>


William Dyer's education in KLT and Sleaford, Carre Grammar School <William & Mary Dyer: William Dyer’s boyhood (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>


** Church of St Denys in Kirkby La Thorpe
Denys in Kirkby La Thorpe <William & Mary Dyer: Kirkby La Thorpe’s Church of St. Denys (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>


The bubonic and
typhoid plagues of 1625, including in Lincolnshire: <William & Mary Dyer: William Dyer’s annus horribilis -- Plagues of 1625 (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>


The Great Frost of
1608: <William & Mary Dyer: The Great Frost of 1608 (marybarrettdyer.blogspot.com)>

Domesday Book of 1086 that mentions the Saxon Earl Morcar and the 
area of Kirkby LaThorpe. (You can make out "thorp"  in the second paragraph.)
The Domesday Book was a survey of who owned what and how much
could the king levy in rents and fighting men.


Tuesday, February 2, 2021

Anne Hutchinson featured in television documentary

 


In 2019, six documentary film producers were tasked with researching and filming six hour-long segments on the spread of Christianity across the world. The documentaries were pulled together by a script writer and narrated by actor Dennis Haysbert. Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) began airing the monthly episodes called “INEXPLICABLE: How Christianity Spread to the Ends of the Earth” in early 2020, but stopped at the beginning of the pandemic. They restarted the series, on a weekly basis, in January 2021.

Segment Four, the spread of Christianity in North America, was created by filmmaker James Langteaux, and airs Thursday, February 4, at 8:00 p.m. ET, 7:00 CT, 6:00 PT, and 5:00 PT, on TBN, which is a worldwide network, so it should be available to viewers of cable, satellite, and broadcast channels. (It may be available online after a few days.) The series combines interviews with experts and dramatic recreations of people and events.

Producer Langteaux contacted Christy K Robinson, author of two popular historical research blogs and four historical books that center on early colonial New England religious leaders, and asked her to speak “passionately” about Anne Marbury Hutchinson and her “bold, heroic life,” as he put it. Though he filmed Robinson for several hours, she doesn't expect to be onscreen more than a few seconds or minutes at the beginning of the episode.

She says, “I hope that my synopsis on Anne Hutchinson and Mary Barrett Dyer, the Quaker martyr who died for religious liberty in 1660, came in handy to the script writer. Both women were pioneers of religious and civil liberties in the 1630s through 1650s, almost 400 years before their time—and their struggle continues to this day.”

Robinson's interest in Anne Hutchinson began in the 1980s, when a Bible teacher talked about Antinomianism, which many historians have ascribed to Hutchinson's name. “Antinomian” means “against the entire (Old Testament/old covenant) Law,” which some believe was supplanted by the new covenant of salvation by grace. Robinson learned through years of research that religious denominations which arose in New England, owed much of their theology to the early colonial Puritan ministers, whose experiences, beliefs, and practices influenced generations of our ancestors, and numerous American denominations.

For more information on Anne Hutchinson, please visit <https://MaryBarrettDyer.blogspot.com/2020/01>

For more information on INEXPLICABLE, please visit Inexplicable | TBN <https://www.tbn.org/programs/inexplicable/episodes> . 

To watch the hour-long episode, visit https://watch.tbn.org/videos/inexplicable-part4 

Short trailer of Episode Four: